Media Coverage of Top 10

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Media Coverage of Top 10

Categories: Blog, Internal

As word spread from Chicago’s Field Museum that the 10 finalists has been announced for the $10 million George Barley Water Prize, the media took notice.

Here’s the story from Miami’s NPR station, WLRN (http://wlrn.org/post/finalists-announced-10-million-contest-solve-algae-problems-plaguing-florida-and-world):

Finalists Announced In $10 Million Contest To Solve Algae Problems Plaguing Florida… And The World

They sound like environmental superheroes.

“We have toxic algae that’s choking communities. It’s impacting local economies, the environment, public health. It has to be dealt with,” said Eikenberg.

At a ceremony in Chicago on Thursday, the foundation announced which 10 competitors from its initial field of 104 may have the best technology to knock out villainous phosphorus runoff and the algae blooms it fuels in the greater Everglades ecosystem. All 10 teams advance to stage three of the four-year competition, and the top three finalists earned monetary awards totaling $80,000.

“We have to innovate and that’s what this prize is doing. … It’s highlighting innovation,” Eikenberg said.

The finalists hail from the United States, the Netherlands and Canada, and their diverse origins reflect the devastation algae blooms have wrought on communities worldwide.

In recent years, massive blooms have choked wildlife and local economies in places from Lake Erie and the Chesapeake Bay to the Arabian Sea. And, of course, Florida’s coasts: In the summer of 2016, an eruption of blue-green algae devastated tourism and fishing in coastal communities.

The outbreak prompted Florida Senate President Joe Negron to champion a water storage reservoir intended to reduce discharges of phosphorus-heavy water that contribute to the algae. Negron’s bill ultimately passed despite controversy over the reservoir’s possible location, and on Thursday, the South Florida Water Management District held the second of at least three public meetings to discuss progress.

Read more: What We Talk About When We Talk About Everglades Restoration

Eikenberg said the goal of the Barley Water Prize is to encourage private sector solutions to the algae problem.

“We can’t regulate, we can’t litigate, we can’t legislate — there’s no time for that,” he said.

The competition is co-sponsored by Scott’s Miracle-Gro, a major fertilizer manufacturer that removed phosphorus from its products in 2011.

In the third stage of competition, finalists will go to Ontario for several months to test their technologies in cold weather.


Here’s the story from WaterWorld (http://www.waterworld.com/articles/2017/10/top-10-contenders-named-in-10m-george-barley-water-prize.html):

TOP 10 NAMED IN $10M GEORGE BARLEY WATER PRIZE

CHICAGO, IL, OCT 27, 2017 — The top 10 contenders in the George Barley Water Prize, a $10 million worldwide competition to find a solution to the algae crisis, were named today during a ceremony at Chicago’s Field Museum. The top 10 teams, from the United States, Canada and The Netherlands, emerged from an initial field of 104 competitors from 13 countries.

“These 10 teams represent our best hope to solve the algae crisis that threatens drinking water supplies, kills fish and wildlife and is choking thousands of waterways around the globe,” said Eric Eikenberg, CEO of the Everglades Foundation, which is sponsoring the competition.

The Barley Prize is a multi-year, $10 million international incentive award to the team that develops a safe, cost-effective technology to remove phosphorus from water. Phosphorus, contained in urban and agricultural runoff and used widely in chemical fertilizers, is a principal cause of algae.

“Today, it would cost $3 trillion even to reduce the current phosphorus flow by just 10 percent,” Eikenberg explained. “Scientists believe there is so much accumulated phosphorus in the system that, even if we could ban its use altogether, it would continue to be a serious pollutant for decades — if not centuries — to come.”

Thanks to the cooperation of the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, Eikenberg explained that the top 10 contenders will now test their technologies under cold weather conditions in the Town of Bradford West Gwillimbury, north of Toronto.

The 10 teams whose technologies were selected to advance in the Barley Prize competition are:

 Global GPR, Idaho Falls, Idaho

Green Water Solutions, Inc., Wellington, Florida
MagPi, Delta, British Columbia, Canada
MetaMateria Technologies, LLC., Columbus, Ohio
MicroHAOPS, Inc., Seattle, Washington
Restoring the Natural P Cycle with HIX-Nano, Richboro, Pennsylvania
University of Idaho TEAM blueXgreen-Cool Planet, Moscow, Idaho
University of Waterloo, Toronto, Canada
U.S. Geological Survey, Leetown Science Center, Kearneysville, West Virginia
Wetsus NaFRAd ULTRA, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands

The Presenting Sponsor for the Barley Prize is Scott’s Miracle-Gro Foundation. Scott’s has been an industry leader in addressing nutrient pollution from phosphorus, Eikenberg explained. In 2011, the company became the largest fertilizer manufacturer in the world to remove phosphorus from its fertilizer products.


And there was this story from Canada NewsWire (http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/delta-bc-company-named-among-top-10-in-10-million-water-prize-653429333.html):

Delta, B.C., Company Named Among Top 10 In $10 Million Water Prize

CHICAGOOct. 26, 2017 /CNW/ — Muddy River Technologies, Inc., based in Delta, British Columbia, headed by Dr. Rob Stephenson, has been named among the top 10 contenders for the George Barley Water Prize, a $10 million worldwide competition to find a solution to the algae crisis. The top 10 emerged from an initial field of 104 competitors from 13 countries.

“These 10 teams represent our best hope to solve the algae crisis that threatens drinking water supplies, kills fish and wildlife and is choking thousands of waterways around the globe,” said Eric Eikenberg, CEO of the Everglades Foundation, which is sponsoring the competition.

The Barley Prize is a multi-year, $10 million international incentive award to the team that develops a safe, cost-effective technology to remove phosphorus from water. Phosphorus, contained in urban and agricultural runoff and used widely in chemical fertilizers, is a principal cause of algae.

“Today, it would cost $3 trillion even to reduce the current phosphorus flow by just 10 percent,” Eikenberg explained. “Scientists believe there is so much accumulated phosphorus in the system that, even if we could ban its use altogether, it would continue to be a serious pollutant for decades – if not centuries – to come.”

The Muddy River Technologies entry, called “MagPi,” uses a four-stage electrochemical process to dissolve excess phosphorus and convert it into struvite – a combination of magnesium, natural ammonia and phosphate that can be reused as fertilizer.

Thanks to the cooperation of the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, Eikenberg explained that the 10 top contenders will now test their technologies under cold weather conditions in the Town of Bradford West Gwillimbury, north of Toronto.

The Presenting Sponsor for the Barley Prize is Scott’s Miracle-Gro Foundation. Scott’s has been an industry leader in addressing nutrient pollution from phosphorus, Eikenberg explained. In 2011, the company became the largest fertilizer manufacturer in the world to remove phosphorus from its fertilizer products.

CONTACT: Rob Stephenson
EMAIL: dr.rob.stephenson@gmail.com